The Ongoing Pursuit


According with the CIDH and Al, during the attacks in Iguala 6 people were killed, 25 were wounded and 43 were disappeared. The deaths and the disappearances have left 180 direct victims and around 700 indirect victims as result of the number of affected families.


From the beginning, the Mexican government has been questioned for trying to close the case and discredit it, besides not provide the necessary care to victims. During more than one and a half year the families of the 43 missing and the killed have tried to get answers about what really happened with their sons, they have organized searches of clandestine graves and brigades to find info with the locals of Iguala helped by a local organization called "The Other Disappeared" which began after the disappearance of the Ayotzinapa students. 

Inside their homes, there are portraits of the disappeared near to religious images as offerings to keep hope despite the time. As they still looking for the truth, the families of the missing hold their love for their sons, their husbands, their fathers and their brothers.


Funded by Art Works Projects through the Emerging Lens Award. 

Bernardo Campos, father of the disappeared student José Ángel Campos, stands at the entrance of his home in Barrio El Fortín, near the Aytozinapa school. The sign on the door says: "They had no mercy. Justice for Ayotzinapa".

info
×

América Campos, daughter of José Ángel Campos, at her bedroom, in front of a kite with a portrait of her father.

info
×

Bernabé Abraján and Delfina de la Cruz, parents of Adán Abraján in their room with their grandson as they talk about their disappeared son.

info
×

Ángel Abraján, son of Adán Abraján de la Cruz aside a memorial to remember his father inside his home.

info
×

Parents of the 43, Ayotzinapa students, local guides and volunteers getting ready to go out on a search in Iguala. In this place, the San Gerardo church, an organization called The Other Disappeared meet every weekend to search clandestine graves around Iguala.

info
×

 María Elena Guerrero, mother of Giovanni Galindrez Guerrero, an Ayotzinapa student and Janet Arzola, sister Luis Ángel Francisco Arzola,  stand near Iguala to ask for information about the 43 missing students.

info
×

On the left, a local prays to blessing some of the parents of the 43 disappeared students, before they start a search on a marginalized locality on the outskirts of Iguala.

info
×

Bernardo Campos holds a portrait of José Ángel Campos, his disappeared son on a wall of his home.

info
×

The family of José Ángel Campos. His two daughters América and Gabriela, and his wife at the bedroom where they used to sleep.

info
×

Delfina de la Cruz, mother of the Ayotzinapa disappeared student Adán Abraján de la Cruz, carries her grandson on the field that their family uses to plant their food.

info
×

Eleucadio Ortega, father of Mauricio Ortega Valerio, sleeps on the ground during a raining night after a search brigade in Iguala.

info
×

Some children hear parents of the 43 disappeared students, as they ask for information about their sons to locals of Iguala.

info
×

A wall with family portraits and a piñata of the mexican guerrilla leader "Subcomandante Marcos", now called "Galeano", at home of the Abraján de la Cruz family.

info
×

Allison Abraján, daughter of Adán Abraján de la Cruz, plays with an umbrella inside her home

info
×

Delfina de la Cruz Felipe going outside her home with one of her grandsons, nephew of one of the 43 disappeared students

info
×

Bernardo Campos, father of José Ángel Campos during a search in the mountains around Iguala.

info
×

A piece of bone on the ground. Searching the mountains, where a local organization called The Other Disappeared of Iguala has found 142 corpses since the disappearance of the 43 Ayotzinapa students in that city. Over the last four years, 4,700 people were killed in the state of Guerrero.

info
×

Bernabé Abraján, father of Adán Abraján, sleeps on the ground outside San Fernando church after a day of search brigades. In February 2015, he was one of the parents who traveled to Geneva to speak with the United Nations Committee on Enforced Disappearances.

info
×

Joaquina García on the entrance of her home at Zumpango municipality.

info
×

In her bedroom, Joaquina García looks a portrait of her son, Martín Sánchez García, who was 19 years old. Just before learning her son had disappeared overnight, she was preparing pozole for the two to share to celebrate his first days of class at Ayotzinapa.

info
×

Joaquina García and her daughters stand inside the bedroom where Martín Sánchez García used to sleep.

info
×

María Elena Guerrero, mother of Giovanni Galindrez Guerrero,asking to a local for information about the 43 missing students.

info
×

Bernabé Abraján de la Cruz prays in front of an offering to remember the 43 Ayotzinapa missing students, at the basketball court in the Ayotzinapa teaching school

info
×

Francisco Rodríguez, father of Everardo Rodríguez, and a student of the Ayotzinapa teaching school ask to locals for some information about the 43 missing, near the place where they were kidnapped by the police

info
×

Ayotzinapa students in the place where students were killed by the police on September 26th, 2014. Bullet marks on the wall marked by circles.

info
×

Delfina de la Cruz cry as she talks about her dissapeared son Adán Abraján de la Cruz

info
×

Clothing remains in the mountains near Iguala, during a search for the 43 missing students. A local organization supporting the Ayotzinapa case, The Other Disappeared of Iguala, has brought together more than 500 families from Iguala and surrounding areas to find the remains of their loved ones in clandestine graves.

info
×

A portrait of the disappeared student José Ángel Campos and his daughter América Campos, in the hands of his wife

info
×

Portrait of the Sánchez García family at their home. Joaquina García holds a portrait of her disappeared son, Martín Sánchez García.

info
×
Using Format